Connecting the dots in your life

Imagine you discover the perfect job description, one that seems written just for you. What would it look like? Mine might read something like this:

Looking for someone who wants to make work better for individuals, companies, and organizations seeking to make a difference. Must have experience with social networks and behavior change, and must have written a book about these topics. Should enjoy public speaking and interacting with people around the world. Buddhist tendencies a plus.

I’m pretty sure such a job description doesn’t exist. But such a job might.

Evidence I might be right

I was thinking about this in Houston last week. I had just delivered a presentation about making work better for individuals and the firm. During Q&A, there were questions about social networks and about ways to change behavior. A few people holding copies of Working Out Loud asked me to sign them.

Then someone came up to me and asked “Are you a Buddhist?” I was a bit taken aback, and somewhat embarrassed that I didn’t deserve the label. “An aspiring one,” I said, and asked why he thought so. He said, “some of the things in your introduction made me think you might be.”

That’s when it struck me that the different interests in my life could, however improbably, connect to form a coherent career.

Connecting the dots

Discovering your purpose

I had written about this idea before in a post titled “Discovering your purpose”:

A few decades ago, perhaps, we could take a personality test, list our talents, and find a suitable career. Not any more. Today, the world of work has splintered into a infinite set of ever-changing possibilities. So we have to learn to explore and discover our purpose.

Because it’s easier than ever to make things - from blogs to businesses - and to connect with people interested in those things, we’re no longer limited to a small set of job descriptions neatly carved up by Human Resources. Even if you have a traditional job, you can craft it to be more meaningful and tap into more of your interests. All of this makes it more likely you can connect the dots in your life.

My own learning is to avoid relying on luck or, worse, a boss to make those connections. Instead, I’ve found that a better path to discovering your purpose is building relationships and remaining open. That’s what brings you into contact with new possibilities, and lets you see opportunities you may not have even imagined before.