WOL Circle Guides now in Turkish!

Even the phrase “Circle Guides” in Turkish - “Çember Kılavuzu” - looks and sounds exotic to me. Seeing over 120 pages of Working Out Loud material in Turkish is a miracle!

It’s also a huge amount of work: translating thirteen guides, standardizing words and phrases, coordinating people across multiple timezones, double- and triple-checking for consistency and correctness. All of it by volunteers. Sebnem Maier, who organized the effort, also set up a LinkedIn group for “WOL Türkiye Topluluğu” and requested Turkish readers contact her with any edits or comments.

I asked Sebnem and the team what motivated them to take on such a big project, and here’s what they said. I’m grateful for all they’ve done, and inspired by why they did it. 

***

Since I have started my WOL experience in 2016, I was dreaming to have the guides in Turkish to reach people in my country who may have interest in WOL. So my dream has been fulfilled thanks to the great team who translated the guides with me voluntarily. Now, all Turkish-speaking people have the possibility to experience WOL and I am very happy about it.

Sebnem Maier – Senior manager at Robert Bosch GmbH, WOL Mentor, WOL Co-Creation Team

I felt that it was a simple yet genuine tool designed to help people to understand how to add a human touch to  their digital relations. I just wanted to have more people exposed to it and not be limited by language. We need to get closer and together. In person or on digital platforms. We need to relearn to look and see each other eye to eye, people to people, without boundaries of our limitations.

Nurhayat Ulucan – HR Manager, PPG Turkey

I observed in my Turkish Circle as a moderator that language might be a barrier for some people. For a successful rollout of the method, which is what I aim in my home country, Turkey, and for a better life as the WOL ambassador, it was necessary to have the guides in my mother language.

Rüya Demirtas – Project manager, Process improvement specialist, Bosch Turkey

It is a unique method which helps to discover and to understand your own goals by building relationships. We are happy and excited to help WOL reach more people by helping to translate the guides to Turkish.

Ebru Bakir Kandemir & Zafer Kandemir

As a psychology student, what motivated me to become a part of WOL was the enlightening experience of self-actualization, self-realization and self-confidence with the weekly Circle meetings in a friendly, understanding environment.

Zeynep Taş – Junior Student Majoring Psychology at Koç University in Turkey 

We have been searching for a sharing methodology to organize women's Circles to harness our sisterhood's knowledge and passion to share with each other. WOL will unlock this potential. Thank you John and the team! 

Melek Pulatkonak – Founder of TurkishWIN & BinYaprak  

What would you say to 400 knowledge managers?

Today, I’ll fly to Houston to take part in the APQC Knowledge Management (KM) conference. Many of the 400 attendees have been working on KM for years, some for decades. They’re already experts when it comes to the tools and processes they need. 

But something has been missing. The traditional focus on tools and taxonomies has left little room for a harder challenge: people.

Long-time KM experts like Stan Garfield and Nick Milton have written often about the need for focusing on behavior change and a cultural shift. (In one of Stan’s recent articles, the word “culture” appears 8 times.) To increase both the supply and demand of knowledge, you have to create an environment where people are intrinsically motivated to share and search for knowledge as part of their everyday work. But how?

The talk before mine will have many of the answers. It’s by Dan Coyle, author of the excellent book, The Culture Code. Here’s an excerpt from an APQC article about their interview with Dan. 

I have asked KM leaders what their main objective is for implementing KM.  And, overwhelmingly, the #1 response is to “change the culture of the organization.”  

A collaborative culture feels and works better. Dan’s formula for success focuses on

1) making the environment safe to accelerate building relationships and trust,

2) demonstrating how leaders can use vulnerability to forge reciprocity, and

3) creating a roadmap that gets people onboard for the journey ahead.

WOL is a method for implementing some of these ideas. That’s why the APQC also wrote that “Working Out Loud is KM’s most transformative trend.” WOL Circles give people a chance to do what Dan writes about: exchange knowledge, vulnerability, and more all in a psychologically safe space. And the method helps them practice over time till they develop new habits and a new mindset. As the new behaviors spread, the culture changes.

I hope to give a good talk. More importantly, though, I hope to give each of the 400 attendees something they can use, so they can finally fill in the piece that’s been missing, and kick off culture change movements of their own.

Sunday Night Syndrome

The symptoms appear gradually. A slight knot in the stomach. A mounting sense of dread, a feeling of irritation, even anxiety, about what’s about to happen. Sunday Night Syndrome affects an alarming number of people, and it’s beginning to feel like an epidemic. 

A telltale sign is when you say, “I wish I didn’t have to go to work on Monday.” 

I suffered from SNS for most of my life. Sometimes the symptoms appeared as early as Sunday morning, even Saturday night, further spoiling the already too-short weekend escape.

Since everyone around me suffered from the same symptoms, I did nothing about it. Week after week after week. 25 years old, 35, 45, 50. I sat there like the proverbial frog placed in a pot of water on the stove, slowly dying inside, never jumping out.

Do you suffer from any signs of Sunday Night Syndrome? Or know someone who does? The only cure I’ve found is tap into a sense of self-determination, a sense that you have some control, that you’re not a victim. 

It doesn’t have to be a big leap. You don’t have to quit or change your entire life with a bold move. I find such remedies too risky anyway, and not terribly effective. Instead, I recommend a small step, an experiment of a kind: block out one hour every Monday to invest in yourself. 

Maybe you use that hour (less than 3% of your week), to work on a new skill or research a topic you’re interested in. Maybe you use the time to shape your reputation, sharing what you’re learning or doing on your intranet or LinkedIn. Maybe you form a WOL Circle and meet on Mondays, taking advantage of the structure, shared accountability, and support to make progress towards a goal you care about.

Don’t be the frog, waiting to be rescued. If you don’t invest in yourself, who will?

Disengaged at work.jpg

New: Version 5 of the WOL Circle Guides

She said it in such a serious, deadpan way that I knew she wasn’t kidding. “Please,” she told me, “don’t change the guides.”

That was Katharina Krentz from Bosch. She had created materials related to each of the 12 weeks, and changes would mean a lot of extra work. The translations, now in eight other languages, would also have to change. Besides, she pointed out, with more than 500 Circles at Bosch and over 5000 members in their internal WOL Group, there was no need to change anything.

“Yes, and…,” I thought. Since the last update, there have been so many useful resources I’ve wanted to add. And the new, professionally-designed materials - videos, a journal, and soon a workbook - made the old version of the Guides look like, well, like I designed them myself. 

So I tried to modify the material in a way that won’t cause undo work for people already using them, and yet will still be a significant improvement. The result is version 5 of the WOL Circle Guides.

What’s new?

The biggest change is that I added a new section to the website: workingoutloud.com/resources. I removed the lists of links in the PDFs, and created a webpage for each week that includes a wider range of resources - media, examples, more exercises, more FAQs. This is much more flexible, and makes it possible for me to regularly add new resources that the WOL community finds useful. (I especially enjoyed creating a new photo gallery in Week 12.)

The guides have also been professionally redesigned, using a new style and layout that matches the journal and the other materials I’m working on. I find the new design much cleaner and easier to read. 

The final change is to the licensing language that was on each section of the guides. Older versions used a restrictive Creative Commons license that confused some people, especially the "non-commercial" part. That has been replaced with standard copyright language that’s more precise about what companies can and can’t do. To me, it doesn't change what organizations have already been doing. My intention is just to make it clearer.

What’s next?

Today, I published the English version of the new Guides, and German will be available soon. (I’ll be sure to create German versions of the Resources pages too.) Then I’ll apply the new design to all the translations.

With the maturity of the Circle Guides comes the chance to develop new products and new practices. Here are a few I’m working on:

  • The WOL Circle Video Series & companion journal are being used in company pilots now. They’re part of a new WOL Library that includes assets that make Circles more effective and help companies spread them. (The new “What is Working Out Loud?” video will give you a feel for what the videos look like. It’s also subtitled in German and Turkish, with more languages coming soon.)

  • A beautiful new workbook is under development, and will be for sale via the website. It will be a hardcover book that includes the guides, extra content, and the chance to do the exercises and capture your progress in one place. 

  • The WOL: Self-Care pilot is coming to an end. I’m grateful to the 100 people who participated, and will incorporate what we learned into a next version of the WOL:SC guides that I’ll publish in May. 

  • WOL: Purpose, another new practice, and experiments in healthcare and manufacturing are all just beginning. I’m extremely excited about each of them.

The only reason any of this work is possible is because of you and the WOL Community. I’m grateful to all of you who’ve tried a Circle and those who’ve generously spread the word.

I hope you like the new Guides. If you’re in the middle of a Circle, you can begin using them right away. If you have a resource you think should be included in the new section on the website, please send me an email at john.stepper@workingoutloud.com. I’ll be glad to hear from you.

Clink on the image to see the new Getting Started section

Clink on the image to see the new Getting Started section

A letter from my future self

I’ve been meaning to write a new letter for years now, but something inside me resisted it. Perhaps I’ve been afraid of what’s ahead, or afraid that writing down what success will look like is presumptuous, something not yet earned. 

Recently, however, someone posted that this letter exercise in Week 7 was hard for them, and that gave me the nudge I needed. I thought, If I can’t do it, how can I ask others to try? So here it is. To help me write my letter, I put the timeframe further out than usual. That made it safer for me somehow.

The instructions say to write this letter for yourself, not to impress someone else. That’s what I tried to do. I share it here to offer another public example of what such a letter might look like, and also to serve as a visible reminder of what I aspire to accomplish.

April 24, 2034

Dear John,

Well, here we are: 2034. It’s a number I thought I’d only see in Science Fiction stories. (I still remember when Orwell’s 1984 was a distant future.) Now I’m 70 years old. More precisely, we are 70. Congratulations to both of us for making it this far.

A lot has happened, some of which you hoped for, and some which you didn’t dare to dream about at the time. Brace yourself, though. It wasn’t easy.

Our family is doing well. The kids are great. As you grew to be more comfortable in your own skin, that made it easier for others to be comfortable with and around you. It took much longer than we both might have hoped, but you made steady progress. The yoga and meditation helped. The move to Japan helped a lot, too. Life is simpler here. You became clearer about what’s important and why.

I remember how fragile you were when you started on your own. You were so worried all the time, about making a living, about being a good provider, about your status after having lost your job. If it wasn’t for your wife’s strength, support, and love, you never would have made it through this period. Be good to her.

The funny part is that things picked up when you stopped trying so hard to make it all work. When you focused on the contribution instead - on making things other people found genuinely helpful and useful - all of the other things you wanted flowed from that. 

To be sure, there were blow-ups. Some were near fatal to your business and movement. But then someone would send you a note, saying that you made a difference, and that was enough for you to keep going. The kindness of your WOL community was a source of strength. Never underestimate how important they are. 

A key turning point was around 2019 or 2020. Back then, you were like a little boy on a diving board, looking down, uncertain whether to make the leap or climb back down to earth. Some big companies were Working Out Loud, but you were cautious, always unsure or afraid of whether the little success you had would last. 

Then you leapt. You started to work with people in factories, hospitals, and schools, looking to help people who need it most. You expanded WOL to include practicing self-compassion, and enabling people to make the work they do more purposeful.

In the last fifteen years, you reached a million people. That’s a big number In ways large and small, you changed how they related to themselves, to others, and to they work they do. You can let yourself be proud of that.

If I have any advice for you, it’s this: Think ten times bigger. A hundred times bigger. Worry less about making mistakes, or about “who am I to attempt such a thing?” Dare to make a difference. Not for yourself or for your business, but for other people. The world could still use it, maybe now more than ever.

With love and respect.

Your Future Self

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New video: “What is Working Out Loud?"

It’s less than four minutes long, and is part of four hours of video content in a WOL library I’m piloting with several companies. There are subtitles in German, with more languages coming soon. 

When I shared it in the WOL groups on LinkedIn and Facebook, the reactions were exactly what I was hoping for. 

“Already added it to our ESN WOL Group”

“Sharing it next week in our WOL community”

“This video will help us to make the WOL movement even stronger!”

I hope you find it useful.

Answers to "What's WOL?" "How does a Circle work?" “What’s in it for me & for the company?”

If you want to spread WOL in your organization, consider this

Bosch & Daimler quickly recognized they would need help. The grassroots WOL movements they built had taken root, leading to support from management including board members. But how could they scale?

One element of their strategy is to train WOL Mentors, internal people who can support and spread Circles. The first certification workshop, which took place over a year ago, was something of an experiment. The training has evolved since then, and now you can participate in the best version yet.

The main idea

The point of WOL Mentor Training is to equip you to build a WOL movement in your organization. That includes giving you insights and material to help you support Circles. What are common challenges? How do you deal with  them? How do you integrate Mentors into your WOL community? The training also includes access to the new WOL Video Library, where you’ll find resources to help you deliver WOL talks and workshops. 

With this “train the trainer” approach, you can develop an internal capability that allows you to scale your WOL movement.

Next Session: March 5-6 in Berlin

This first public two-day workshop is organized and delivered by Kluge Consulting, and will be in German. (Sabine & Alexander Kluge are good friends as well as two of the first WOL Coaches.) Because individuals from multiple companies will join, Mentors will learn from each other too, through exchanging approaches and implementation innovations. You can find information about content, logistics, and costs of the training here.

Of course, you don’t need a Certificate to spread WOL. But as the Working Out Loud community has grown and more companies are spreading Circles, there’s a lot we’ve all learned about how to do it well. Mentor Training is the best way we know to tap into that learning, to accelerate and scale the change you want to deliver to your organization.

What could WOL for Healthcare look like?

Her note started off nicely enough. Then I read her feedback, including a challenge I didn’t know what to do with.

Bettina had heard about WOL Circles at a conference and liked the idea. “I started my first Circle directly. With great success!” She said she is working as a Change Manager in a large non-profit healthcare organization in Germany, and that she wanted to spread Circles. But she made it clear that WOL, in its current form, would never work. 

“The nurses, doctors, and other professionals do not have 60 minutes a week for WOL, there is too much text, the examples have to refer to the health sector…” 

Ouch. She even said the German translation wasn’t acceptable, as the informal pronoun (“du”) simply isn’t used in her organization’s “official papers.”

I knew she was right. I asked if we could speak on the phone. 

The challenges in Healthcare

Healthcare organizations suffer from the same cultural issues that plague many large companies. The hierarchical structures limit information flows in ways that are bad for individuals, the organization, and the patient. Too often, nurses don’t question doctors and medical technicians don’t question the ambulance manager. (Atul Gawande, surgeon, author, and CEO of the recently-formed healthcare venture formed by Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JP Morgan Chase, captured these challenges in dramatic fashion in The Checklist Manifesto.) 

The same is true across the hierarchy as well. People in a given role are not in the habit of of sharing problems and solutions to improve quality, and in many cases there may be no mechanism to do so. So the same mistakes get repeated, and innovations don’t spread. 

On top of such challenges, all of this takes place in an environment that is extraordinarily demanding. It’s busy, stressful, and unpredictable - and the stakes are extremely high.

One possibility

Of course, not all healthcare organizations have the same cultural issues. Buurtzorg, for example, has over 10,000 professionals in “a nurse-led model of holistic care” that emphasizes “humanity over bureaucracy.” They are portrayed in Reinventing Organizations as a model of self-organization and self-management. But for every Buurtzorg, there are thousands of traditional companies. 

How could WOL help?

I told Bettina how we had already adapted WOL for leaders by making it shorter and simpler, and by integrating it into a reverse mentoring program. Perhaps we could do something similar. 

Together, we decided that Bettina’s colleagues could also meet in pairs (perhaps one with more experience and one new to the organization), and we could limit meeting to no more than 30 minutes. Then we identified eight different exercises over eight weeks - eight contributions they could make that would help them find their voice, improve their craft of patient care, and enable them to re-connect with the sense of purpose that inspired them to join the profession in the first place.

What would you do?

The challenges faced by people in healthcare environment are similar to those in other operational environments, be it manufacturing, retail, transportation.

As different as those jobs may be, the people doing them all share the same human needs for control, competence, and connection. And all of the organizations they work in need to improve quality for their customers and for their own sustainability. The future of work isn’t limited to people working in offices.

Bettina and I will meet in Frankfurt this week to work on details of a pilot. Whatever the outcome, we’ll surely learn something that can help us take a next step and try again.

If you were Bettina, what would you do? What could WOL for Healthcare look like?

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“Back in the game”

I almost passed over it because it was in Italian. But I clicked on the translation button, and even the mechanically generated prose was beautiful.

Marcello had participated in a Working Out Loud Circle in Bologna, organized by the same group that produced the Italian translation of the Circle Guides. He had put together a short video describing what the experience meant for him, and someone shared an excerpted quote of his.

“…an opportunity to put me back in the game, rediscover some skills that I had inside me, reconnect relationships, reactivate myself with a new enthusiasm to realize projects I care about…”

We could all use that kind of “reactivation” sometimes. Maybe your company is re-organizing again. Or you took time off for parental leave. Or you need to find a new job. These can be challenging times. Your confidence and even your sense of identity can be impacted.

Your inclination might be to withdraw, to wait for something better to turn up. But a better approach can be to do the opposite. To purposefully connect with people and create your own web of support and encouragement. Your network can be a lifeboat in a sea of change, helping you explore opportunities you would never reach otherwise. It can be a source of confidence, emotional support, and friendship. 

Marcello found all of that in his WOL Circle. It’s not the only way, of course. But small steps in a safe, confidential space can often be just what you need in times of change. Your Circle members, even when they’re complete strangers, can show you things about yourself you’ve stopped seeing or believing. They can also show you possibilities you haven’t considered. Week after week, as your network grows, so do you.

If you want more out of work and life, waiting on the sidelines is no place for you to be.

INTERVISTA A MARCELLO FINI BIBLIOTECARIO ARCHIGINNASIO BO

WOL Circle Guides now in Italian!

I never met my grandparents, Vito and Angelina Bruno. They emigrated from Piaggine, Italy to New York City about a hundred years ago by boat. No jobs, not much money or education, unable to speak English. I suspect they would be thrilled about this latest development: WOL in Italy.

The first Circle members in Bologna sharing their experiences with an audience

The first Circle members in Bologna sharing their experiences with an audience

I first heard from Samantha Gubellini in February of this year. She works at a management consulting firm, SCS Consulting, and she told me she hoped to do a pro bono experiment with the city council in Bologna, applying the WOL method in a “smart city program.” As part of that test, they would translate the guides into Italian. 

The first Circles just ended, and Circle members recently shared their personal experiences in a gorgeous room in Bologna. Below are two translated snippets from posts on LinkedIn. (See here, here, and here for some of the original posts in Italian.)

“During the 12 weeks we laughed, we cried, we celebrated the progress, shared the failures and we supported ourselves to overcome the obstacles. We have learned the basics of working aloud, but we do not want to stop here: our intention, and our challenge, is to continue to use these tools in our professional and personal path.” 

“What was WOL for me? So many things.. Live the emotions without brakes, understand the point of view of your colleagues, share the experiences - even the deepest, but above all show yourself without being judged! I laughed, I cried, I discussed, I shared.. In practice I opened the heart to people who until recently were unknown!” 

It was Teresa Arneri and Maria Chiara Guardo who took on the extraordinary work of translating the thirteen Circle Guides, and they’re now publicly available. Teresa wrote me a note about what motivated her to do it.

“As you could seen on LinkedIn,  the WOL experience ended in one of the most beautiful and emotional ways!

The WOL Circle Groups’ testimonials were impressive and able to spread the importance of WOL to those who still didn’t know anything about the project. The result was quite surprising, as we know that the WOL method is something difficult to convey! But the audience showed enthusiasm and seem to understand this innovative approach.

Since the beginning, when I first met the WOL methodology while surfing on the web, I immediately felt that this kind of practice was meant to be successful. In fact, the methodology plays with such elements that no other classical training (that also teaches how to build collaboration) is able to transmit.

WOL is based on simple, common things that are part of a system of natural rules that human beings have acquired since the beginning of time, in order to be able to coexist and survive within a community.

This is for me the power of WOL. Therefore it was impossible to not collaborate to the spread of this method by our contribution of the Italian translation of the guides! 

Thank you so much John (Giovanni) 😊

Teresa”

I hope to meet Teresa, Maria, and Samanta in Bologna someday, and give them my thanks in person, along with a heartfelt “Grazie mille!” from Vito and Angelina.