The missing piece in most quality programs

I fell in love with W. Edwards Deming over twenty-five years ago. He was already in his 90s by then, but his philosophy of work and management was only gradually spreading. I felt like I had discovered A Fundamental Truth. But like other Truths, it was inconvenient to people in power, and was ignored or purposefully misinterpreted.

So when I saw a recent article titled “Deming, Finally!” I was curious. When I noticed it was co-authored by Celine Schillinger, I made a point to read it carefully, since I greatly respect her work driving change at the pharmaceutical company, Sanofi.

“Today, everyone in the manufacturing quality world has read, heard, spoken about Deming. His vision for quality and “14 points of management” as well as the “System of Profound Knowledge” in particular are inescapable reference points.
However, Pharma may have got this all wrong for the last 30 years. By focusing on processes, control and exhortations, manufacturers have missed the essence of Deming’s message.
Deming advised us to actually put the Human at the center of quality and to focus on how the system works.”

The missing piece in most quality programs is the human being. Deming understood that and most of the elements of “the Future of Work” decades ago, but he wasn’t really heard.

Deming would have benefited from better communications & behavior change methods, and I think Working Out Loud Circles can help with both - whether it’s work in an office or in manufacturing plants, in hospitals or schools. I’ll offer some specific suggestions in an upcoming post. In the meantime, read Celine’s article if you can, and let me know what you think about the topic. 

How would you make quality and continuous improvement more human?